Garifuna American Youth Dance Company HASANIGU GARINAGU Headline an Afternoon Cultural Presentation of Garifuna Folk Music and Dance in the BRONX on SATURDAY May 17th 2014

Garifuna Artists and Dance Companies Scheduled to Present Folk Dances and Music in the Bronx on SATURDAY May 17th 2014.

Garifuna Artists and Dance Companies Scheduled to Present Folk Dances and Music in the Bronx on SATURDAY May 17th 2014.

Copyright 2014 by Teofilo Colon Jr.  (a.k.a. “Tio Teo” or “Teofilo Campeon”) All Rights Reserved.  Telephone: (646) 961-3674.

Twitter:  @beinggarifuna

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/beinggarifuna

Instagram: http://instagram.com/beinggarifuna_com

Bronx, New York — Young Garifuna American Dance Group, HASANIGU GARINAGU (“Garifuna Youth” in the Garifuna Language) presents an afternoon of Garifuna Folk Music and Dance honoring Garifuna Culture, History and Identity in the Bronx on SATURDAY, May 17th 2014.  Other Garifuna singers and musicians are also scheduled to perform at this unique event.  Notably, most of the acts are of Guatemalan Descent.

Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

Shipping Company RR Izabal Shipping (646) 920-9995 or (646) 295-7493; which ships items to the Department of Izabal in Guatemala is the sponsor of this Garifuna Cultural Event in the Bronx.  Most Garifuna people from Guatemala are from Livingston “La Buga” and Puerto Barrios, Guatemala, both of which are located in Izabal.

Map of Garifuna Territories in  the Central American country of Guatemala as well as southern Belize at the 2013 Smithsonian FolkLife Festival.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Map of Garifuna Territories in the Central American country of Guatemala as well as southern Belize at the 2013 Smithsonian FolkLife Festival. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.  

Acts Scheduled to also perform at this Garifuna Cultural Event in the Bronx include:

Don Cuellar

Paula Castillo

Ervin Arzu

Marcony Star

Chief Joseph Chatoyer Garifuna Folkloric Ballet of New York

 –

Garifuna Singers Paula Castillo and Sofia Blanco are backed by Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.

Garifuna Singers Paula Castillo and Sofia Blanco are backed by Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

Below is VIDEO of Hasanigu Garinagu singing the Happy Birthday song in the Garifuna language in 2011 at Our Lady Of Victory / St. Augustine Catholic Church in the Bronx.  It was impromptu and I didn’t get it from the beginning.

This unique Garifuna Cultural Event will take on SATURDAY, May 17th 2014 place at:

MS 224 Middle School Auditorium

345 Brook Avenue (between E. 141st St and E. 142nd St)

Bronx, NY 10454

TIME: 2pm to 6pm

Bus: BX 15 Bus to 142nd St and Willis Avenue

Subway: 6 Train to Brook Avenue Subway Stop

Tickets are $10

 –

SPONSOR -- RR Izabal Shipping.

SPONSOR — RR Izabal Shipping.

SPONSOR — RR Izabal Shipping Company.  (646) 920-9995, (646) 295-7463.

Those interested in buying tickets ($10) to this unique event can call:

Luis Baltazar (917) 370-2339

Nancy Mejia (646) 500-3252

Olga Nunez (917) 582-8538

Edgar Valenzuela (347) 780-6087

Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.

Hasanigu Garinagu at The 2011 International Honduran and Central American Festival in the Bronx. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.  

ABOUT The Garifuna People

The Garifuna people are people of African descent (in other words, Black people) whose ancestry can be traced to Africans mixing with Carib Indians and Arawak Indians on the Eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent.  From this fusion of race and ethnicities in St. Vincent Island, a distinct culture and language arose.  They are noted for being one of the few (only?) peoples of African descent (again, in other words, Black people) in the Americas to have maintained aspects of their ancestral culture and full use of their ancestral language for everyday use over the course of hundreds of years.

After being defeated in war with the British on St. Vincent in 1796; 1004 men,  1779 women and 1,555 children for a total of 4,338 people (mostly Black Caribs, as the Garifuna people were then known) were captured and taken to Baliceaux, a small island, a rock, basically, off the coast of St. Vincent.  This took place from July 1796 through February/March 1797.  About 2,000 Garifunas died of a mysterious and very infectious fever while living on Baliceaux awaiting their fate.   1

In early March 1797, the remaining Garifunas were loaded onto the HMS Experiment and other ships.  Once they were rounded up, the convoy were taken to a Bequia, which is another island off the coast of St. Vincent. They proceeded to go to Grenada to get water, then Jamaica for refueling, then finally Roatan, Honduras, arriving on April 12th 1797.

Finding much of Roatan unliveable, the Garifuna people petitioned officials representing Spain and it’s government (which controlled much of Central America at the time) to be allowed to move to the Honduran mainland.  Upon being allowed to move to the Honduran mainland, the Garifunas settled many towns and villages along the Caribean coast of Honduras.  They also migrated to the neighboring countries of Guatemala, Belize (then known as British Honduras) and Nicaragua over the years.

 

– –

Notes:

  1. Nancie L. Gonzalez, “Sojourners of the Caribbean: Ethnogenesis and Ethnohistory of the Garifuna” pg. 21

Comments

comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*
Website