(VIDEO) How Do You Say, “Listen” in the Garifuna Language?

What's the word for "listen" in the Garifuna Language?  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All  Rights Reserved.

What’s the word for “listen” in the Garifuna Language? Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

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New York, New York — Recently, Josie Aranda, a reader of Beinggarifuna.com from New York City, sent a note to me via Facebook asking, how do you say, “Listen” in the Garifuna Language?

to find out, go to the video below,

 

how do you say "listen" in the Garifuna Language?  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

how do you say “listen” in the Garifuna Language? Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

 

i should add that the word in question, is the root word.  Once you begin using the word, tenses and what not in the Garifuna Language changes the composition of the word.  In fact, the photos that i am using to illustrate the word “listen’ can be interpreted to be demonstrative of the word “overhear’ which is slightly different.

What is the word in the Garifuna Language for "Listen".  Photo by teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights reserved.

What is the word in the Garifuna Language for “Listen”. Photo by teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights reserved.

 

“Overhear” in the Garifuna Language is,” aganba-gua.”  I am emphasizing the suffix -gua to note the difference.  i am avoiding using the root word for “listen” in the Garifuna Language because i feel it is important in this case to listen and speak the garifuna language, not READ it.  Which you can do by watching the video.

 

How Do you Say "Listen" in the Garifuna Language?  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

How Do you Say “Listen” in the Garifuna Language? Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

I plan on making more videos regarding various aspects of BEING GARIFUNA,  In fact, i’ve wanted to do this for a tew years now.  I hope to figure out the best way to approach it.  Do I only speak in English or do I also speak in Spanish?  What do you think I should do?  Let me know by writing below.

ABOUT The Garifuna People

The Garifuna people are people of African descent (in other words, Black people) whose ancestry can be traced to Africans mixing with Carib Indians and Arawak Indians on the Eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent.  From this fusion of race and ethnicities in St. Vincent Island, a distinct culture and language arose.  They are noted for being one of the few (only?) peoples of African descent (again, in other words, Black people) in the Americas to have maintained aspects of their ancestral culture and full use of their ancestral language for everyday use over the course of hundreds of years.

After being defeated in war with the British on St. Vincent in 1796; 1004 men,  1779 women and 1,555 children for a total of 4,338 people (mostly Black Caribs, as the Garifuna people were then known) were captured and taken to Baliceaux, a small island, a rock, basically, off the coast of St. Vincent.  This took place from July 1796 through February/March 1797.  About 2,000 Garifunas died of a mysterious and very infectious fever while living on Baliceaux awaiting their fate.   1

In early March 1797, the remaining Garifunas were loaded onto the HMS Experiment and other ships.  Once they were rounded up, the convoy were taken to a Bequia, which is another island off the coast of St. Vincent. They proceeded to go to Grenada to get water, then Jamaica for refueling, then finally Roatan, Honduras, arriving on April 12th 1797.

Finding much of Roatan unliveable, the Garifuna people petitioned officials representing Spain and it’s government (which controlled much of Central America at the time) to be allowed to move to the Honduran mainland.  Upon being allowed to move to the Honduran mainland, the Garifunas settled many towns and villages along the Caribean coast of Honduras.  They also migrated to the neighboring countries of Guatemala, Belize (then known as British Honduras) and Nicaragua over the years.

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE.  Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.

 

Notes:

  1. Nancie L. Gonzalez, “Sojourners of the Caribbean: Ethnogenesis and Ethnohistory of the Garifuna” pg. 21

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