Flushing Town Hall in Queens Rocked to The Core With An Unforgettable Show by The AFRI-GARIFUNA JAZZ ENSEMBLE on SUNDAY August 24th 2014

 

Copyright 2014 by Teofilo Colon Jr.  (a.k.a. “Tio Teo” or “Teofilo Campeon”) All Rights Reserved.  Telephone: (646) 961-3674.

Twitter:  @beinggarifuna

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/beinggarifuna

Instagram: http://instagram.com/beinggarifuna_com

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE.  Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.

Queens, New York — The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble did it again.  According to Journalist and Photographer Tequila Minsky in the Caribbean Life Newspaper, The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble produced a magical afternoon of music and dance that compelled patrons to rush to the dance floor.

This performance took place on SUNDAY August 24th 2014 and was the featured presentation for Flushing Town Hall‘s summer wrap-up and welcome to fall concert.

First Page of The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper.  August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

First Page of The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper. August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

As the name of the band suggests, The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble mixes Jazz music with Garifuna Language and Garifuna rhythms to form a one-of-a-kind new form of music.  Founded by Honduran Garifuna American Lucy Blanco and Belizean Garifuna James Lovell, the group continues to captivate audiences as they introduce music lovers to a new sound.

The Afri Garifuna Jazz Ensemble (from Left To Right):  STANDING -- James Lovell, Dre Barnes, Hilliard Greene, SEATED -- Lucy Blanco, Eva Vossmerbaumer.

The Afri Garifuna Jazz Ensemble (from Left To Right): STANDING — James Lovell, Dre Barnes, Hilliard Greene, Gary Fritz.  SEATED — Lucy Blanco, Eva Vossmerbaumer.

The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble consists of:

Lucy Blanco — Lead Vocals, Maracas

James Lovell — Garaun (Garifuna Drum)

Dre Barnes — Piano

Hilliard Greene — Bass

Gary Fritz — Percussion

Eva Vossmerbaumer — Violin

First Page of The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper.  August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

First Page of The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper. August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

While co-founder James Lovell was unable to take part in this particular concert due to his leading the YuGaCuRe (“YUrumein GArifuna CUltural REtrieval”) Children’s Workshop in St. Vincent Island; members of the Bodoma Original Garifuna Band–led by Garifuna Percussionist Bodoma–filled in with the end result being a show for the ages.

Article on The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble in The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper.  August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

Article on The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble in The Arts and Entertainment Section of The Caribbean Life Newspaper. August 29th through September 4th 2014 Issue.

To read more, read Miss Tequila Minsky’s first hand account in the Carribean Life Newspaper.

Did you hear about the concert by The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble at Flushing Town Hall In Queens?   Photo by Sami Abu Shumays via Facebook.

Did you hear about the concert by The Afri-Garifuna Jazz Ensemble at Flushing Town Hall In Queens?
Photo by Sami Abu Shumays via Facebook.

ABOUT The Garifuna People

The Garifuna people are people of African descent (in other words, Black people) whose ancestry can be traced to Africans mixing with Carib Indians and Arawak Indians on the Eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent.  From this fusion of race and ethnicities in St. Vincent Island, a distinct culture and language arose.  They are noted for being one of the few (only?) peoples of African descent (again, in other words, Black people) in the Americas to have maintained aspects of their ancestral culture and full use of their ancestral language for everyday use over the course of hundreds of years.

After being defeated in war with the British on St. Vincent in 1796; 1004 men,  1779 women and 1,555 children for a total of 4,338 people (mostly Black Caribs, as the Garifuna people were then known) were captured and taken to Baliceaux, a small island, a rock, basically, off the coast of St. Vincent.  This took place from July 1796 through February/March 1797.  About 2,000 Garifunas died of a mysterious and very infectious fever while living on Baliceaux awaiting their fate.   1

In early March 1797, the remaining Garifunas were loaded onto the HMS Experiment and other ships.  Once they were rounded up, the convoy were taken to a Bequia, which is another island off the coast of St. Vincent. They proceeded to go to Grenada to get water, then Jamaica for refueling, then finally Roatan, Honduras, arriving on April 12th 1797.

Finding much of Roatan unliveable, the Garifuna people petitioned officials representing Spain and it’s government (which controlled much of Central America at the time) to be allowed to move to the Honduran mainland.  Upon being allowed to move to the Honduran mainland, the Garifunas settled many towns and villages along the Caribean coast of Honduras.  They also migrated to the neighboring countries of Guatemala, Belize (then known as British Honduras) and Nicaragua over the years.

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE.  Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.

 

 

 

Notes:

  1. Nancie L. Gonzalez, “Sojourners of the Caribbean: Ethnogenesis and Ethnohistory of the Garifuna” pg. 21

Comments

comments