FREE Health Clinic in Bronx at Headquarters of Garifuna Non-Profit Organization HONDURANS AGAINST AIDS INC (a.k.a. “Casa Yurumein”) On SATURDAY December 5th 2015

 

Bronx, New York — A FREE Health Clinic will be taking place at the Bronx headquarters of Garifuna Non-Profit Organization, Hondurans Against Aids Inc (a.k.a. Casa Yurumein) on SATURDAY, December 5th 2015.  This Health Clinic is available to the public at large.

Copyright 2015 by Teofilo Colon Jr. (a.k.a. “Tio Teo”).  All Rights Reserved. Telephone: (646) 961-3674.

According to a flyer notifying people about this activity, A Medical Team led by Dr. Hoffman from Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx will be providing counseling on breast cancer, prostate cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, HIV and other health topics.

Flyer for the FREE Health Clinic at Casa Yurumein in the Bronx on SATURDAY, December 5th 2015.

Flyer for the FREE Health Clinic at Casa Yurumein in the Bronx on SATURDAY, December 5th 2015.

Doctors and Pediatricians will be available to answer questions regarding health-related topics.  Also, CONFIDENTIAL HIV Testing will be given FREE to those interested.   For more information, please call Hondurans Against AIDS Inc Executive Director (and Founder), Mrs. Mirtha Colon at (718) 213-5439.

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE. Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.  Donations are accepted through the PAYPAL website, so potential donations are SAFE and SECURE. 


Dr. Julie Hoffman is an infectious disease specialist in the Bronx and is affiliated with Jacobi Medical Center.  She has been a doctor for 25 years and received her medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University.  1

Dr. Julie Hoffman of Jacobi Medical Center at the ONECA Black Central American Women's Conference in the Bronx in November 2014.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Dr. Julie Hoffman of Jacobi Medical Center at the ONECA Black Central American Women’s Conference in the Bronx in November 2014. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

Dr. Hoffman was a panelist and presenter at the 2014 ONECA Black Central American Women’s Conference in the Bronx in November 2014.  2

Dr. Julie Hoffman of Jacobi Medical Center at the ONECA Black Central American Women's Conference in November 2014.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Dr. Julie Hoffman of Jacobi Medical Center at the ONECA Black Central American Women’s Conference in November 2014. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

This FREE Health Clinic will take place at the headquarters of Garifuna Non-Profit Organization, Hondurans Against AIDS Inc (a.k.a. “Casa Yurumein”) on SATURDAY, December 5th 2015 from 10am to 4pm.  Casa Yurumein is located at:

Entrance to Garifuna Non-Profit Organization, Casa Yurumein (a.k.a. "Hondurans Against AIDS Inc") in the Bronx.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Entrance to Garifuna Non-Profit Organization, Casa Yurumein (a.k.a. “Hondurans Against AIDS Inc”) in the Bronx. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.

Casa Yurumein (a.k.a. “Hondurans Against AIDS Inc”)


874 Prospect Avenue (bet Westchester and E. 161st St)

Second Floor

Bronx, NY 10459

(718) 991-2233

TRAIN: Prospect Avenue Stop on the 2 / 5 Subway Line

BUS: BX 17 Bus


About CASA YURUMEIN

Casa Yurumein is the location of Hondurans Against AIDS Inc, a Garifuna non-profit organization based in the Bronx. It offers social services to the Black Central American (Garifuna and Non-Garifuna) and Central American population in the Bronx. Informally known as Casa Yurumein (“Yurumein House” in Spanish, Yurumein is the Garifuna word for St. Vincent; the ancestral homeland of the Garifuna People), it was housed in a former convent owned by St. Augustine Church in the Bronx since June of 2009. In the fall of 2012, it moved to it’s new location on Prospect Avenue in the Bronx.

Representatives of Casa Yurumein (a.k.a. "Hondurans Against AIDS Inc") Marching with 2012 Miss Garifuna Arianna Flores in the 2012 Bronx Week Parade.  Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  All Rights Reserved.

Representatives of Casa Yurumein (a.k.a. “Hondurans Against AIDS Inc”) Marching with 2012 Miss Garifuna Arianna Flores in the 2012 Bronx Week Parade. Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr. All Rights Reserved.


Since being founded in 1993, Casa Yurumein essentially evolved into a hub for most things Garifuna in the Bronx.  Not only are Garifuna Arts & Crafts classes for youth held there, but the Miss Garifuna training for Young women taking part in the Annual Miss Garifuna NY Cultural Pageant takes place there.

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE.  Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.  Donations are accepted via the PAYPAL website so your potential donations are SAFE and SECURE.

The Garifuna Language Course takes place there as well.  Not only that, but most Bronx Garifuna organizations from other non-profits to Garifuna Home-Town Associations in the Bronx hold meetings there.  The Executive Director of Hondurans Against AIDS Inc (a.k.a. “Casa Yurumein”) is Mirtha Colon, a Garifuna woman from Trujillo, Honduras.  Mrs. Mirtha Colon is a clinical social worker with a Masters in Social Work.

Executive Director of Casa Yurumein, Mirtha Colon at the 2013 Barauda Awards in the Bronx.  Photo from Facebook.

Executive Director of Casa Yurumein, Mirtha Colon at the 2013 Barauda Awards in the Bronx. Photo from Facebook.

ABOUT The Garifuna People


The Garifuna people are people of African descent (in other words, Black people) whose ancestry can be traced to Africans mixing with Carib Indians and Arawak Indians on the Eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent.  From this cultural fusion of race and ethnicities on St. Vincent Island, a distinct culture and language arose.  They are noted for being one of the few (only?) peoples of African descent (again, in other words, Black people) in the Americas to have maintained aspects of their ancestral culture and full use of their ancestral language for everyday use over the course of hundreds of years.

After being defeated in war with the British on St. Vincent in 1796; 1004 men, 1779 women and 1,555 children for a total of 4,338 people (mostly Black Caribs, as the Garifuna people were then known) were captured and taken to Baliceaux, a small island, a rock, basically, off the coast of St. Vincent.  This took place from July 1796 through February/March 1797.  About 2,000 Garifunas died of a mysterious and very infectious fever while living on Baliceaux awaiting their fate.   3

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE. Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.  Donations are accepted through the PAYPAL website, so potential donations are SAFE and SECURE. 


In early March 1797, the remaining Garifunas were loaded onto the HMS Experiment and other ships. Once they were rounded up, the convoy were taken to a Bequia, which is another island off the coast of St. Vincent. They proceeded to go to Grenada to get water, then Jamaica for refueling, then finally Roatan, Honduras, arriving on April 12th 1797.


Finding much of Roatan unliveable, the Garifuna people petitioned officials representing Spain and it’s government (which controlled much of Central America at the time) to be allowed to move to the Honduran mainland.  Upon being allowed to move to the Honduran mainland, namely the port town of Trujillo, Honduras in May 1797; the Garifunas settled many towns and villages along the Caribbean coast of Honduras.  They also migrated to the neighboring countries of Guatemala, Belize (then known as British Honduras) and Nicaragua over the years.  Finally, Garifuna People have also migrated to the United States of America where generations have settled in cities like New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles.

Finally, Garifuna People have also migrated to the United States of America where generations have settled in cities like New York City, Chicago and Los Angeles.  Despite their mainly Spanish surnames, their culture and history are distinct from other Afro-American and Latino ethnic groups and it’s important to keep that in mind.

If you find the BEING GARIFUNA Website helpful and useful, please DONATE. Every dollar donated helps keep this website in operation.  Donations are accepted through the PAYPAL website, so potential donations are SAFE and SECURE. 


 

Notes:

  1. http://health.usnews.com/doctors/julie-hoffman-60431
  2. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152487679528596.1073741921.305542983595&type=3
  3. Nancie L. Gonzalez, “Sojourners of the Caribbean: Ethnogenesis and Ethnohistory of the Garifuna” pg. 21

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